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Why we do, what we do!

Los Amigos has received $1,182,012 in grant money that has gone directly into six very successful projects that we have completed on the Preserve since 2006.

The reason for this restoration work is to return the Preserve to the condition it was in before extensive grazing and logging took place. Those activities caused many roads to be developed which were poorly placed and maintained and caused wetlands and wet meadows to drain and pour sediment into the streams.

As a result, the State listed 7 segments of the streams on the Preserve on its 303d list as not meeting their highest and best use as cold water fisheries. The most prevalent reason for this is that the temperature of the streams is too high, largely due to increased sedimentation and loss of wetlands. The State wants to “de-list” the streams and that is what we have received money to try to do.

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Our projects have measurably lowered the temperature in some areas of the streams and have created or re-created several hundred acres of wetland and wet meadow. We continue to do work because the streams are not yet de-listed.

We currently have two active projects, one on Sulphur Creek and one on Indios.  We also made a proposal for a 319 project to write a Watershed Based Plan for the Preserve, which will be necessary for us to receive additional 319 money.

The “319” refers to the section of the Clean Water Act that refers to non-point source pollution. The Sulphur grant is 104b3 money (the wetlands section of the Clean Water Act) and the Indios is state money from the River Stewards program.